A Road Trip Through Scotland II

Scotland

I feel like I should ramble some more about a trip that I took a some weeks ago. If you haven’t seen my last post, you can read it (or just look at the pictures) here at A Road Trip Through Scotland. But I’ll just give you a brief in-depth summary now. Went to Scotland. Enjoyed Glasgow. Rented a car. Saw pretty things and now I’m here. Ok, I hope I didn’t lose you yet. I’ll start off like I started off last time, the reason why I first wanted to see Scotland was because of Neist Point. The little sea cliff that I loved so much I had to go back the next morning.

The Isles of Skye

The Isles of Skye (from the old Norse sky-a, meaning ‘cloud island’) was filled with remarkable natural sights. The Isles’ rugged sea cliffs, and mountainous scenary sparked with life at every turn. The dark jagged basalt appeared to be breaking through the ground, forming the natural landscape of this island. It’s the home to some of the most beautiful places I have been fortunate enough to experience such as Neist Point, the Quiraing, Fairy Glen, the Old Man of Storr and much more. I spent about two and half days here but could have easily spent a lot longer. Pictures just do not do the Isles of Skye justice, but hey I tried.

A map, a car, a camera and the road

Its the not the Destination, It’s the journey.’ Yes, very cliché I know. A phrase that I have heard so many times that I tend to forget it’s true value.

When I began planning for Scotland, I did what most people tend to do. I googled places to see in Scotland. And of course, I find plethora of beautiful photographs of castles, waterfalls, landscapes, cities and honestly thats great. I made it a point to see a lot of these places but some of my most memorable moments and favorite photographs are of those that you can not find on google or Pinterest. I believe it’s because these are my personal experiences. These are the places that I choose to stop at because they incited my curiosity. We all have our own stories and the ones who have experienced these well known places, share the same sort of paragraph in their story (If that makes any sense). But those places in between are what makes everyones story unique and different. And that’s a beautiful thing. Here are a few paragraphs from my story.

From Edinburgh to Glasgow

Other than Scotland’s natural beauty, it is home to a rich history. I felt like everywhere I turned, I was surrounded by stories of the past. From castles to cobble stone roads to cathedrals and cemeteries, exploring these places made me feel like a kid again. Honestly, all I could do was try to soak in as much information that I could, and I am still trying to process everything that I saw. Edinburgh and Glasgow, although somewhat opposite, will remain very close to my heart. These are cities that I saw the sun disappear in and shedding light the next. I felt at home here. This was truly an unbelievable experience, that I would not have changed one moment of. Until next time Scotland and thank you for your hospitality but most importantly, thank you for changing my life for the better.

Food For Thought

I’ve been asked by a few people how traveling alone was so I thought I’d share my experience of it. When I first thought about traveling alone, in all honestly I was terrified of. I mean the very idea of not knowing where you are let alone, anyone you know is quite frightening. I was clouded with ideas of everything that could go wrong but I’ve always dreamed of someday of taking an prolong road trip and just traveling. If I ever wanted to do this I knew at some point that I would have to be comfortable traveling alone. So I took a chance, sucked it up, swallowed my fears and decided to go to Scotland solo.

Preparing for this involved in constant researching on other’s experiences as well and a few solo overnight trips to dip my toes into. I learned a lot from South Dakota and the Upper Peninsula, such as what were my necessities and what I could do without i.e less is more. But most importantly I learned how to be comfortable being by myself (which was a little hard because I could be very talkative to myself).

What I took out of this experience was an indescribable experience. Some may think that it will be lonely, but this was far from that case. Photography and the mystery of being somewhere new, preoccupied my mind to the point that I did not even grasp the idea that I was alone. There are moments where your initial fear resurfaces but it’s quickly put to rest once you recognize where you are, and that the world is not as scary as you imaged. The most exciting part about traveling alone is that your flying first hand outside of your comfort zone, igniting that flame of curiosity and wonder. And you realize how exciting life can be again.

I feel like every trip that I take I always end it by saying that I learned a lot about myself and so on. And Scotland was no different. Everything thing that I have learned in the past, I have applied to the present which only opens another door of lessons to face. Life is a learning experience that everyone is trying to master. But the beauty lies in each person’s pursuit of it.

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A Road Trip Through Scotland

Scotland

A few weeks ago I embarked on an 8 day adventure to the most northerly part of the United Kingdom. Scotland. My interest was first sparked by a little light house carving it’s way out towards the sea. After finding out that this place truly does exist, I knew I had to see it. So I went. The first few days were filled with awe while wandering from Glasgow north towards the Isle of Skye. It still feels like I wandered into someone else’s dream. Here’s are a few snippets of that adventure in no particular order at all.

Neist Point

Neist Point Lighthouse sits on a rocky cliff-top in the most westerly part of the Isles of Skye. Being the reason for visiting Scotland, I think I unknowingly built up such a high expectation that I feared that I may be disappointed. But those thoughts quickly faded the second I heard the waves crashing against the shore. I never thought in my wildest of dreams that I would find myself traveling solo, 3,500+ miles from home, watching the sun set at a place like this. At Neist Point.

A map, a car, a camera and the road.

Scotland awaits. But first I have to get used to this whole driving on the opposite side of the road thing. After one mistake, I quickly became a natural. When planning this trip, I had this crazy idea. What if I drove around with no particular place to go and just enjoy the country. (I know, it was a pretty intricate plan) There were a few places I wanted to see but I basically wanted to enjoy everything that was in between. Scotland is a magical place. It’s a place where you often find yourself lost in the moment. But I’ll stop now before I start sounding like a Disney sponsored post.

Glasgow

This was my first time traveling solo and Glasgow was the place that would first greet me to Scotland. It was a warm welcome indeed. It’s a beautifully, eclectic city. A mixture of stories and those waiting to be told. I was quickly immersed in the city but could not help but notice familiar scenes. Joggers running along the river. Kids playing int the park, Streets filled with people going on with their day. Stopping to listen to a musician that I heard passing by. It reminded me of home. Walking through Kelvingrove Park I had a moment where I saw myself living here. Who knows this may be one of those stories waiting to be told.

 

Food For Thought

  • Your curiosity outweighs your fear.
  • Don’t buy a can of soup when you don’t have a can opener.
  • A saved digital map can help you plan the next day.
  • Buy more than bread and cereal just incase you lose your credit card the first night. (This may be a tip just for me)
  • The internet isn’t all that important.
  • How to open up a can of soup with a box cutter.

 


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